teaching

Using-Sketchnoting-For-Learning-Featured

Using Sketchnoting for Learning

Sketchnoting can be a powerful learning tool for adolescents. The process is highly individualized, and students can choose to sketchnote in a notebook or digitally on a tablet or phone with a stylus and tons of free or low-cost apps.

10-Popular-Homeschooling-Methods-Featured

10 Popular Homeschooling Methods

If you’re planning on homeschooling your child, you’ll need to learn the many styles of homeschooling that’s available so that you can decide which would work best for your family. Here’s an overview of the 10 most popular homeschooling styles.

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year-by-year-teaching-guide-for-homeschoolers-featured

Year by Year Teaching Guide for Homeschoolers

We’ve created this series to help you on your journey, providing grade level specifics you can use as a guide whether you’re planning how to support your preschooler’s curiosity and creativity, deciding which science to teach your 5th grader, or trying to ensure that your child is well prepared for life and education after high school.

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The-Best-Books-for-New-Homeschoolers-Featured

The Best Books for New Homeschoolers

The-Best-Books-for-New-Homeschoolers-Featured

For parents who are newcomers to homeschooling or are just considering the idea, how-to books can be goldmines of information. The trick is to glean what will work for your family, and leave the rest. Here are some great resources.

The Best Books for New Homeschoolers

Cathy Duffy’s 100 Top Picks for Homeschool Curriculum

Duffy is a respected curriculum reviewer and a veteran homeschool mom. This book, written from a Christian perspective, is very helpful in figuring out learning styles, for both parents and children. Duffy guides parents in deciding what their homeschooling goals are and helps to match up families with curriculums they’re likely to enjoy. She categorizes the curriculums by such measures as parental prep, hands-on activities, amount of writing, ease of use, etc.

Mary Pride’s Complete Guide to Getting Started in Homeschooling

Weighing in at 620 pages, this book takes its title seriously. It covers everything a new homeschooler would possibly need to know, from learning styles to homeschooling methods to organization to support groups and co-ops. Pride, who is publisher of “Practical Homeschooling” magazine and mom of nine, includes other voices and opinions throughout the book. She also offers recommendations for further reading.

The Homeschooling Book of Answers by Linda Dobson

This down-to-earth book answers 101 of the most common questions about homeschooling, like “How will my child make friends?” “How much does it cost?” and “Is it possible to homeschool my child with special needs?” Dobson and her contributors provide honest answers, including the good, the bad and the ugly of homeschooling. It is realistic as well as idealistic. Dobson has also written other helpful books for newbies, including “Homeschooling the First Year” and “The Ultimate Book of Homeschooling Ideas.”

Things We Wish We’d Known, compiled and edited by Bill and Diana Waring

Full of been-there, done-that advice from some of the country’s most famous homeschooling parents, this book is a treasure trove of wisdom that comes only through experience. These pioneers and leaders share their secrets with us so that we can avoid their pitfalls and re-create their triumphs.

Educating the Whole-Hearted Child

Written from a Christian perspective, this book provides a glimpse into the home of Clay and Sally Clarkson, homeschooling advocates and parents of four. They emphasize using whole books and turning your home into a place where children will love to learn. For newcomers who don’t want to re-create school at home, this book is a breath of fresh air and inspiration.

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How-to-Teach-Perfect-Writing-Featured

How to Teach Perfect Writing

With the rapid expansion of the Internet, it is clear that the quality of English writing—both American and British—has taken a dive for the worst. “Netspeak” is obtrusively taking over most electronic communications, making good writing practices increasingly scarce. With such a strong influence the Internet has over the world today, it is no wonder it’s a struggle to help our children make good writing a habit. Even the most intelligent and successful business leaders seem small and insignificant when they distribute e-mails full of spelling errors and non-capitalized sentences. It’s more vital than ever to teach our children to write well before they are released into a relentless and competitive world.

The best way to learn to write is to practice. People learn best by making mistakes and correcting them for themselves. The following method of teaching writing enforces that very concept. It will work for established writers who need to polish their skills, and it will work for the struggling student too. Whether you are working with just one child at home or in a co-op class, you can teach anyone to be a better writer with a little patience and a lot of persistence.

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